Thursday, June 25, 2015

Calla Lilies: Step-by-step video program

This has been one of my most popular lessons in my workshops, learn more about white flowers, shaping petals, creating depth while keeping it simple. Join me in this step-by-step program of painting Calla Lilies in watercolor, I am sure you will enjoy it too.

Single program Click here
Entire online series Click here


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Keep it Simple

Lets keep things simple, here is a quick lesson on how to simplify what we see, the amount of water we use, color, shape and shadow, have fun !

https://youtu.be/rN3pQy2uk48

Saturday, May 16, 2015

How to Paint Moving Water in Watercolor



Learn How to Paint Moving Water in Watercolor, keep it simple and most of all fun. I know this is very different then my usual style, but today I thought it would be nice to show you another technique



Here I will be using a # 20 Wash Mottler and a #8 round blend brush and most of you know how much I love my Arches paper  but here for this technique I used 300 CP Fabriano watercolor paper. Colors are French Ultramarine Blue, Winsor Blue, Perm Sap Green and Indian yellow.



Enjoy and Have FUN!!

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Boats on the Water PRNSA

We just had a magical weekend workshop painting Boats on the Water, we did over twelve paintings, ranging in size from 4x6 to 1/2 sheet, covering a wide variety of techniques from value studies, simplifying an image, tighter detailed work to moody more dramatic among others. 

Our workshop was held at the Historic Life Boat Station at Chimney Rock in the Point Reyes National Seashore and for a special treat we were serenaded by female and young Elephant seals bantering and posturing for each other.


Just outside the window

The ramp used to deliver lifeboats into the ocean

Group Dinner in the Life Boat Station



Values





Life Boat Staion

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Painting a Barn in Watercolor


Say more with less, learn how to paint a simple barn.

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Wobbly paper

Have you ever seen a framed watercolor painting that has a wobbly look to the paper surface?

This usually happens with the lighter weight papers such as 90 -140lb papers and especially if the paper was not stretched before painting. This is one reason why I like to use heavier weight papers for instance 300lb, this way I don't really have to worry about the problem.

When showing your paintings, a wobbly surface can be a bit distracting and may actually cheapen the value of your art. If entering a competition a wobbly paper surface does not really have the professional look that you want and can work against you.

All of us artist's would like to think that the viewer can see beyond the wobbly paper to the actual piece of art, that can be true, but that's not always the case. To show your work at it's best, before framing, consider flattening the painting first.

Option 1: All you have to do is place the painting face down on a clean towel then "lightly" spray the back with clean water, then place another flat surface on top of the painting (such as a piece of Plexiglas or foam core) then weight it down and let completely dry. Your environment will determine  the drying time.

Option 2: A quicker way to do it, is to again place the painting face down on a clean towel then "lightly" spray the back of the painting with clean water, then using an iron on a "low heat" lightly iron the back to flatten.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Same but different

I am sometimes asked why do so many of my students paint the same thing?

From the outside they can all look the same but in reality they are all "SO" different just like the personality of the student artist that painted them.

In my workshops Students always have the option to use their own compositions but rarely ever do. Thave a better understanding of the process and my techniques, the advantage of using same composition helps to prevent the student from falling back into old habits. It also helps to remove the fear of competition or the stress of not being able to draw fast enough which can delay the painting process.

We all have to start somewhere and that is usually by being inspired by another artist's work and In order to have better understanding of how the artist might have created the painting we copy what we see and learn by recreating what has inspired us.

It can all look so easy but in reality it can be quite a challenge.


 This is when the magic happens, using the same composition and basic shapes allows students to apply techniques. Then when giving a critique no one painting is singled out. we all learn from each others painting, what works, what doesn't, color etc. thing you might want to add or change. 


After we look at all of the paintings together, 
we look at each painting individually to see the artist behind the painting.